Tip 01: What is the UKCAT?

The UK Clinical Aptitude Test is a computer-based two-hour examination used by the majority of UK medical and dental schools.

It tests your aptitude, rather than academic ability. Questions examine your cognitive abilities, attitudes and behaviour, not school curriculum or science content, though maths plays an important part.

The UKCAT aims to increase fairness in the selection of students, and attract applicants from a wider background, including under-represented social groups.

Does my school use the UKCAT?

Check the UCAS website.

When do I need to take the UKCAT?

Before you apply to your medical or dental school/university.

We recommend booking as early as possible, because spaces fill up fast. Testing runs from July to October, and you can book up to 90 days in advance.

There are around 150 test centres, so hopefully there’s one close to you. Book early to get a spot in your preferred test centre. Avoiding a long journey to your test reduces the risk of being late and missing your appointment, resulting in expensive re-booking or missing out on your chosen courses this year.

Rebooking is an important consideration: unexpected circumstances such as family emergencies may need you to change your exam date. If you took an appointment at the end of the testing period, it’s highly unlikely that any places will be left.

If you’re reading this well in advance of applying for medicine, and have the available funds, consider taking the UKCAT a year early as a mock exam. The experience will help you prepare and know exactly what to expect in the year of your application. To get the most out of this, try to prepare for it as if it were the real thing.

Can I re-sit?

You can take the UKCAT once per year.

Do I need to practise?

Yes! You need to be familiar with the style, format and nature of the questions, so that you aren’t surprised on the day.
In addition to these free tips, we offer a popular UKCAT online course providing practice questions, mock exams, all with question timing and performance feedback.